Safety awareness and fall prevention in the elderly » Dissertation Consulting Company.


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Safety Awareness and fall prevention among the elderly

Older persons are more likely to suffer injuries from falls, which can have significant health effects like fractures, hospitalization, and even death. The number of older persons who have a fall is anticipated to rise in the upcoming years due to the population’s aging trend (Schoene et al., 2019). Therefore, it’s critical to find solutions to lower this population’s risk of falling. Increasing older folks’ understanding of safety is one area that needs attention in the fight against falls. Safety awareness is understanding potential risks and how to prevent them by a person. Previous studies have demonstrated that older persons who are more conscious of their surroundings and the risk of falling are less likely to fail (Rajagopalan et al., 2017). The current study aims to investigate the association between fall prevention and safety awareness in adult patients in critical care units. The goal was to determine if fall prevention practices, including wearing appropriate footwear, utilizing assistive equipment, and adequately educating adult patients, were linked to safety awareness. The study also examined whether self-reported falls in the previous year were related to safety awareness.

Nurses are essential in fall prevention as falls are a significant cause of injury and mortality in older individuals. By encouraging older persons to be more aware of their surroundings, nurses can help lower the risk of falls. Elderly fall prevention can be significantly aided by nurses, as falls among the elderly are a big concern. Educating patients and their families about fall risks and prevention techniques is just one of the many things nurses can do to help prevent falls. Identifying high-risk patients and assessing individuals’ fall risks (Dykes et al., 2020). Putting fall prevention measures into practice for high-risk patients, such as employing bed rails and bed alarms. Monitoring patients for signs of potential falls, such as dizziness or unsteadiness, and Quickly responding to falls that occur to help prevent injuries.

Nurses may play a significant part in fall prevention by teaching patients and their families about the dangers of falling and how to avoid them. Assessing patients for fall risks and identifying individuals at high risk for falls is another crucial role that nurses may play in preventing falls (Dykes et al., 2020). Putting fall prevention measures into practice for patients at high-risk Nurses can assist in preventing falls by adopting fall prevention methods for high-risk patients after they have been identified. For instance, nurses can help prevent high-risk patients from slipping out of bed by using bed rails and alarms.

Another way that nurses can help prevent falls is by monitoring patients for signs of potential falls. For example, nurses can monitor patients for dizziness or unsteadiness, which may be signs that a fall is about to occur (Chu, 2017). Finally, nurses can help to prevent injuries from falls by quickly responding to falls that do occur. For example, nurses can provide immediate medical attention to fallen patients, which can help prevent further injuries. Overall, nurses can play a crucial role in fall prevention by educating patients and their families about fall risks, assessing patients for fall risks, implementing fall prevention strategies, monitoring patients for signs of potential falls, and quickly responding to falls that do occur.

Clinical Problem Statement

Most injuries and fatalities among the senior population are caused by falls. However, many older persons lack the knowledge and desire to undertake fall prevention behaviors because they are ignorant of the risk factors for falling (Stevens et al., 2017). By examining senior people’s understanding of fall prevention and creating an educational intervention for fall prevention that is based on scientific data, this project will address this critical public health issue. This study aims to examine fall prevention awareness among the elderly and develop an evidence-based fall prevention educational intervention. The study will focus on identifying fall risk factors among the elderly, understanding how they perceive their risk for falling, and investigating what motivates them to adopt fall prevention behaviors. Findings from this study will be used to develop and test an educational intervention to increase fall prevention awareness and reduce falls among the elderly.

The study will also explore fall prevention awareness among adults in critical care. In particular, focus on identifying fall risk factors among this population, understanding how they perceive their risk for falling, and investigating what motivates them to adopt fall prevention behaviors. The results of this study will be utilized to create and evaluate an educational intervention that aims to raise fall prevention knowledge among persons receiving critical care and decrease falls. Overall, this research will aid in the development of methods for preventing falls among the elderly that are supported by scientific data.

Purpose and Change Proposal about providing patient care in the changing healthcare system

This change proposal aims to improve patient care by increasing safety awareness and fall prevention among the elderly. The healthcare system is constantly changing, and it is essential to keep up with the latest changes to provide the best possible care for patients (Zimmermann & Nkenke, 2020). This change proposal will help to improve patient care by providing information on how to prevent falls and increase safety awareness among the elderly. The specific change proposal is to increase safety awareness and fall prevention among the elderly. This can be done by providing information on preventing falls and increasing safety awareness among the elderly. There are many ways to improve safety awareness and fall prevention among the elderly. Some methods include providing information on preventing falls, increasing safety awareness among the elderly, and providing resources on fall prevention.

This change proposal aims to improve patient care by increasing safety awareness and fall prevention among the elderly. The healthcare system is constantly changing, and it is essential to keep up with the latest changes to provide the best possible care for patients. This change proposal will help to improve patient care by providing information on how to prevent falls and increase safety awareness among the elderly.

PICOT QUESTION

In older adults, does increasing awareness compared to not increasing awareness lead to a lowering in the severity of falls within six months?

Literature search strategy

The search phrases “elderly” AND “falls” AND “prevention” AND “safety” might be used in a literature search strategy for the subject of safety awareness and fall prevention among the elderly. This approach would look for academic publications that addressed avoiding falls in the elderly. Older adults are more likely to fall and have injuries as a result. Therefore, it is essential to find scholarly articles focusing on this population’s safety awareness and fall prevention. By using the search terms listed above, you can find articles that specifically address this topic. PubMed and Google Scholar are two good sources for finding scholarly articles on this topic. PubMed is a database of biomedical literature that includes articles from nursing and other health care journals (Irwin & Rackham, 2017). Google Scholar is a search engine that specifically indexes scholarly articles. Both sources will provide you with various articles on safety awareness and fall prevention among the elderly. Sources excluded from this literature search strategy include general search engines such as Google and Yahoo. These sources are not as likely to provide you with scholarly articles on this topic. In addition, sources that focus specifically on falls and injuries among the elderly were also excluded. While these sources may provide some information on safety awareness and fall prevention, they are not as likely to be as comprehensive as the sources listed above.

The first strategy, searching for studies using the terms “elderly,” “falls,” “prevention,” and “safety,” will return several studies specifically on fall prevention among the elderly. It is a good strategy because it will allow you to find studies specifically on fall prevention among the elderly hence will be a good strategy for finding specific studies on the topic. The second strategy, searching for reviews, will provide an overview of the current state of research in this area. This will be a good strategy for an overview of the current thinking on the topic.

 

Literature Review

 A demographic at greater risk for falls is the elderly. The most common accident among older persons is falling, which can have devastating implications like hip fractures, brain injuries, and even death (Deprey et al., 2017). Falls can also result in a decline in general health and a loss of independence. There are several causes of falls in the elderly. These include visual impairment, drug side effects, balance issues, muscular weakness, gait issues, and environmental dangers. Muscle weakness can lead to falls, making it challenging to move around and keep your balance. Balance problems can also lead to falls because keeping your balance when standing or walking can be difficult. Gait problems can also lead to falls because it can be difficult to walk if older people have a problem with their gait (Pirker & Katzenschlager, 2018). Vision problems can also lead to falls because it can be difficult to see where you are. Medication side effects can also lead to falls because some medications can cause dizziness or drowsiness. Environmental hazards can also lead to falls because if there are things in your environment that you can trip over, it can increase your risk of falling (Ganz & Latham, 2020). Preventing falls among the elderly is a public health concern due to the high rates of fall-related injuries and fatalities. Primary, secondary, and tertiary categories can classify the literature on elder fall prevention.

By addressing the root causes of falls, primary preventive measures aim to lower elderly citizens’ risk of falling. These tactics frequently entail changes to the environment and education. For instance, educational programs might inform elders about the value of exercise and a healthy diet for preserving their strength and balance (Rodrigues et al., 2021). Making dwellings more “fall-proof” or adding handrails to stairways and restrooms are two examples of environmental improvements.

Secondary prevention strategies are designed to reduce the severity of injuries sustained in falls. These strategies typically involve the use of personal protective equipment, such as hip pads or helmets. Additionally, secondary prevention strategies may include using assistive devices, such as canes or walkers (Cruz et al., 2019). Tertiary prevention strategies are designed to reduce seniors’ likelihood of recurrent falls. These strategies typically involve the use of monitoring devices, such as fall alarms or GPS tracking devices. Additionally, tertiary prevention strategies may include using home-based or community-based services, such as home health aides or transportation services.

Falls are the most significant cause of fatal and nonfatal injuries among persons 65 and older, with one in four accidents occurring yearly (Kiami et al., 2019). Despite this, falls may be avoided, and the risk of falls in the elderly can be decreased using several measures. Two of the most crucial interventions are improving fall awareness and educating older adults about fall prevention. Community initiatives, health fairs, and individualized instruction can help with this. Older adults must be aware of the risk factors for falling, such as muscle weakness, balance problems, and medications that can cause dizziness or drowsiness (LeWitt et al., 2020). They also need to know what they can do to reduce their risk, such as exercising to improve strength and balance, making their homes safer, and wearing shoes that fit correctly and provide good support.

In addition to improving fall awareness, several other interventions effectively prevent falls among the elderly. These include home safety interventions, such as removing tripping hazards and installing grab bars in the bathroom; exercise programs that improve strength, balance, and coordination; and vision and hearing screenings (Frith et al., 2019). It’s crucial to control drugs because some raise the chance of falling. In order to conduct targeted treatments, fall-risk assessment methods can be used to identify older persons at a high risk of losing. There is a wealth of information on preventing falls in the elderly, and there is solid data to back up several strategies. The most efficient strategy to carry out these treatments and raise older persons’ awareness of falls, however, requires further study.

Evaluation of Literature

Among the elderly, falls are the most common reason for injuries. Fall-related injuries are the leading cause of mortality and disability in persons 65 and older, where one in three falls each year (Kistler et al., 2018). Despite the high rates of falls and fall-related injuries among the elderly, there is little information available regarding effective fall prevention strategies. There is a shortage of research on geriatric fall prevention. The majority of the existing research is observational and does not offer compelling proof of any one intervention’s efficacy. Some studies suggest that simple measures such as home safety assessments and the provision of grab bars and other assistive devices can reduce the risk of falls, but more research is needed to confirm these findings.

Additionally, initiatives to increase public awareness of the issue of falls and injuries caused by falls among the elderly are required (Shankar et al., 2017). Many senior citizens are ignorant of the dangers of falls and may not take precautions to avoid them. Education initiatives aimed at senior citizens and those who care for them can raise awareness of the issue and encourage the adoption of fall prevention measures.

Nursing Theory Applied

The Orem hypothesis is a comprehensive nursing theory that may be used to analyze older people’s safety awareness and fall prevention. The Theory is predicated on the idea that everyone has essential health and well-being needs. Self-care, or the capacity of individuals to take care of themselves, can satisfy this need (Martiningsih et al., 2021). According to the Orem idea, while everyone has the ability to take care of himself, some people might need help from others to do so.

The Theory is applicable in several different areas of nursing, including promoting safety awareness and preventing falls among the elderly. The Theory can be used to develop educational materials and interventions that will help the elderly better understand their falling risks and how to prevent falls (Dolan & Taylor-Piliae, 2019). The Theory can also be used to develop nursing care plans that focus on the promotion of safety and the prevention of falls. The Orem theory can be used to understand safety awareness and fall prevention among the elderly by identifying the individual’s need for self-care and guiding how to meet those needs. The Theory emphasizes the importance of tailoring self-care to the individual, as each person’s needs are unique. This approach can help the elderly identify their risks of falling and take steps to prevent accidents.

The Orem Theory can also apply in bringing change to safety awareness and fall prevention among the elderly by providing them with the necessary knowledge and skills to reduce their risks of falling (Nicolau et al., 2022). Additionally, the Theory can be used to help create an environment that is conducive to safety and fall prevention. The Theory provides a framework for how to bring about change in safety awareness and fall prevention among the elderly by highlighting the importance of providing the necessary knowledge and skills to reduce the risks of falling, as well as creating an environment that is conducive to safety and fall prevention (Straßner et al., 2019). It is based on the idea that people are capable of making changes in their lives if they have the necessary knowledge and skills. The Theory provides a framework for how to bring about change in safety awareness and fall prevention among the elderly by providing them with the necessary knowledge and skills to reduce their risks of falling. Additionally, the Theory can be used to help create an environment that is conducive to safety and fall prevention.

Propose Implementation Plan with Outcome Measure

The proposed implementation plan for safety awareness and fall prevention among the elderly includes the Implementation of an outreach program to increase safety awareness and fall prevention among the elderly, Training staff and volunteers to deliver presentations on safety awareness and fall prevention, and  Implementing a fall prevention program. It will include exercises to improve balance and strength and education on how to prevent falls. It can also include Evaluation of the effectiveness of the program and making relevant adjustments. The outreach program should consist of presentations on safety topics such as fire safety, home safety, and fall prevention. It should also provide information on how to access resources in the community that can help prevent falls, such as support groups, home modification services, and fall prevention classes.

Staff and volunteers should be trained to deliver presentations on safety topics such as fire safety, home safety, and fall prevention. They should also be trained to access community resources that can help prevent falls, such as support groups, home modification services, and fall prevention classes (McKenzie et al., 2016). The fall prevention program should include exercises to improve balance and strength and education on how to prevent falls. It should also provide information on how to access resources in the community that can help prevent falls, such as support groups, home modification services, and fall prevention classes.

The program should be evaluated regularly to determine its effectiveness. Adjustments should be made to the program as needed to improve its effectiveness. Examples of programs that could increase safety awareness and fall prevention among the elderly include (McKenzie et al., 2016). The fire safety program is a program that teaches the elderly about the dangers of fires and how to prevent them. It should also provide information on how to escape a fire and what to do if one occurs. The home safety program is program should teach the elderly about the dangers of home accidents and how to prevent them. It should also provide information on what to do if an accident occurs, such as how to call for help and administer first aid. Fall prevention programs also should teach the elderly about the dangers of falling and how to prevent falls. It should also provide information on what to do if a fall occurs, such as how to call for help and administer first aid.

Evidence-Based practice in creating intervention plan

By doing a literature analysis to identify the treatments that have been successful in lowering falls among the senior population, EBP was utilized to create the intervention plan. Based on this research, specific recommendations were made regarding fall prevention strategies that should be implemented. The recommendations from the literature review included implementing particular exercises to improve balance and strength, improving the home environment to make it safer, and providing education to the elderly individual and their caregivers on fall prevention strategies. The recommendations fit well with Orem’s self-care deficit nursing theory, as they all focus on ways to empower the elderly to maintain their safety and well-being. The exercises and education recommendations will help increase the individual’s knowledge and ability to care for themselves. At the same time, the home environment changes will make it easier for them to do so. The specific exercises recommended are those that focus on improving balance and strength. These exercises can help to reduce the risk of falls by making the individual more stable and less likely to lose their balance (Fasano et al., 2017). Some specific examples of exercises that could be recommended are Tai Chi, walking heel to toe, and standing on one leg.

There are several ways that the home environment can be made safer to reduce the risk of falls. Some recommendations include removing tripping hazards, installing handrails, and ensuring adequate lighting. Other advice can consist of adding grab bars to the restroom and making sure there is a clear path from the bed to the restroom (Fasano et al., 2017). Inform the older person and their carers about fall prevention techniques. Older adults must be taught fall prevention techniques, as well as their caretakers. This education should include information on how to identify potential fall risks, how to reduce these risks, and what to do if a fall occurs. Some specific topics that should be covered include how to get out of bed safely, how to use assistive devices such as canes and walkers, and how to make the home environment safer.

Plans for Evaluating Propose Nursing Interventions

Several ways exist to evaluate proposed nursing interventions for safety awareness and fall prevention among the elderly. One way to evaluate the effectiveness of a proposed nursing intervention for safety awareness and fall prevention among the elderly would be to look at the rate of falls among the elderly before and after the intervention was put into place (Frith et al., 2019). This would give insight into whether or not the intervention successfully reduced the number of falls among the elderly. Another way to evaluate the effectiveness of a proposed nursing intervention for safety awareness and fall prevention among the elderly would be to look at the number of injuries sustained from falls among the elderly before and after the intervention was put into place. This would give insight into whether or not the intervention successfully reduced the number of injuries sustained from falls among the elderly.

Potential Barriers To Plan Implementation           

One way to evaluate the effectiveness of a proposed nursing intervention for safety awareness and fall prevention among the elderly would be to look at the rate of falls among the elderly before and after the intervention was put into place (Dykes et al., 2020). This would give insight into whether or not the intervention successfully reduced the number of falls among the elderly. Another way to evaluate the effectiveness of a proposed nursing intervention for safety awareness and fall prevention among the elderly would be to look at the number of injuries sustained from falls among the elderly before and after the intervention was put into place. This would give insight into whether or not the intervention successfully reduced the number of injuries sustained from falls among the elderly.

 

 

References

Chu, R. Z. (2017). Preventing in-patient falls. Nursing, 47(3), 24–30. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.nurse.0000512872.83762.69

Cruz, A. de, Santana, S. M., Costa, C. M., Gomes da Costa, L. V., & Ferraz, D. D. (2019). Prevalence of falls in frail elderly users of ambulatory assistive devices: A comparative study. Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, 15(5), 510–514. https://doi.org/10.1080/17483107.2019.1587016

Deprey, S. M., Biedrzycki, L., & Klenz, K. (2017). Identifying characteristics and outcomes that are associated with fall-related fatalities: Multi-year retrospective summary of fall deaths in older adults from 2005–2012. Injury Epidemiology, 4(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s40621-017-0117-8

Dolan, H., & Taylor-Piliae, R. (2019). Selecting a theoretical framework to guide a research study of older adults’ perceptions and experiences of falling in the hospital. Applied Nursing Research, 47, 38–40. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apnr.2019.04.004

Dykes, P. C., Burns, Z., Adelman, J., Benneyan, J., Bogaisky, M., Carter, E., Ergai, A., Lindros, M. E., Lipsitz, S. R., Scanlan, M., Shaykevich, S., & Bates, D. W. (2020). Evaluation of a patient-centered fall-prevention tool kit to reduce falls and injuries. JAMA Network Open, 3(11). https://doi.org/10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2020.25889

Fasano, A., Canning, C. G., Hausdorff, J. M., Lord, S., & Rochester, L. (2017). Falls in parkinson’s disease: A complex and evolving picture. Movement Disorders, 32(11), 1524–1536. https://doi.org/10.1002/mds.27195

Frith, K. H., Hunter, A. N., Coffey, S. S., & Khan, Z. (2019). A longitudinal fall prevention study for older adults. The Journal for Nurse Practitioners, 15(4). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nurpra.2018.10.012

Ganz, D. A., & Latham, N. K. (2020). Prevention of falls in community-dwelling older adults. New England Journal of Medicine, 382(8), 734–743. https://doi.org/10.1056/nejmcp1903252

Irwin, A. N., & Rackham, D. (2017). Comparison of the time-to-indexing in pubmed between biomedical journals according to impact factor, discipline, and focus. Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy, 13(2), 389–393. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sapharm.2016.04.006

Kiami, S. R., Sky, R., & Goodgold, S. (2019). Facilitators and barriers to enrolling in falls prevention programming among community dwelling older adults. Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, 82, 106–113. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.archger.2019.01.006

Kistler, B. M., Khubchandani, J., Jakubowicz, G., Wilund, K., & Sosnoff, J. (2018). Falls and fall-related injuries among us adults aged 65 or older with chronic kidney disease. Preventing Chronic Disease, 15. https://doi.org/10.5888/pcd15.170518

LeWitt, P. A., Kymes, S., & Hauser, R. A. (2020). Parkinson disease and orthostatic hypotension in the elderly: Recognition and management of risk factors for falls. Aging and Disease, 11(3), 679. https://doi.org/10.14336/ad.2019.0805

Martiningsih, W., Winarni, S., Acob, J. R., Baua, M. E., & Nugroho, H. (2021). Transactional Self Care and Empathy Theory in Nursing (a perspective). Open Access Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences, 9(G), 273–280. https://doi.org/10.3889/oamjms.2021.7278

McKenzie, G., Lasater, K., Delander, G. E., Neal, M. B., Morgove, M., & Eckstrom, E. (2016). Falls prevention education: Interprofessional training to enhance collaborative practice. Gerontology & Geriatrics Education, 38(2), 232–243. https://doi.org/10.1080/02701960.2015.1127809

Nicolau, C., Ciríaco, M., Ferreira, B., Ferreira, R., Baixinho, C. L., & de Sousa, L. (2022). Preparing the return home of a person after a hip arthroplasty – capacitation for a safe transition. Lecture Notes in Bioengineering, 108–120. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-97524-1_11

Pirker, W., & Katzenschlager, R. (2018). Gait disorders in adults and the elderly. Wiener Klinische Wochenschrift, 129(3-4), 81–95. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00508-016-1096-4

Rajagopalan, R., Litvan, I., & Jung, T.-P. (2017). Fall prediction and prevention systems: Recent trends, challenges, and future research directions. Sensors, 17(11), 2509. https://doi.org/10.3390/s17112509

Rodrigues, I. B., Wang, E., Keller, H., Thabane, L., Ashe, M. C., Brien, S., Cheung, A. M., Funnell, L., Jain, R., Loong, D., Isaranuwatchai, W., Milligan, J., Mourtzakis, M., Papaioannou, A., Straus, S., Weston, Z. J., & Giangregorio, L. M. (2021). The MOVESTRONG program for promoting balance and functional strength training and adequate protein intake in pre-frail older adults: A pilot randomized controlled trial. PLOS ONE, 16(9). https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0257742

Schoene, D., Heller, C., Aung, Y. N., Sieber, C. C., Kemmler, W., & Freiberger, E. (2019). A systematic review on the influence of fear of falling on quality of life in older people: Is there a role for falls? Clinical Interventions in Aging, Volume 14, 701–719. https://doi.org/10.2147/cia.s197857

Shankar, K., Liu, S., & Ganz, D. (2017). Trends and characteristics of emergency department visits for fall-related injuries in older adults, 2003-2010. Western Journal of Emergency Medicine, 18(5), 785–793. https://doi.org/10.5811/westjem.2017.5.33615

Stevens, J. A., Sleet, D. A., & Rubenstein, L. Z. (2017). The influence of older adults’ beliefs and attitudes on adopting fall prevention behaviors. American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine, 12(4), 324–330. https://doi.org/10.1177/1559827616687263

Straßner, C., Frick, E., Stotz-Ingenlath, G., Buhlinger-Göpfarth, N., Szecsenyi, J., Krisam, J., Schalhorn, F., Valentini, J., Stolz, R., & Joos, S. (2019). Holistic care program for elderly patients to integrate spiritual needs, social activity, and self-care into disease management in Primary Care (HOPES3): Study protocol for a cluster-randomized trial. Trials, 20(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s13063-019-3435-z

Zimmermann, M., & Nkenke, E. (2020). Approaches to the management of patients in oral and maxillofacial surgery during covid-19 pandemic. Journal of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery, 48(5), 521–526. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcms.2020.03.011

           

 

 

QUESTION:

  For this project, you will apply evidence-based research steps and processes required as the foundation to address a clinically oriented problem or issue in future practice. 

Develop a 2,500-4,000 written project that includes the following information as it applies to the problem, issue, suggestion, initiative, or educational need of safety awareness fall prevention in the frail elderly Mosty the ones who live at home. 

1-Background 

2-Clinical problem statement. 

3-Purpose of the change proposal in relation to providing patient care in the changing health care system. 

4-PICOT question. 

5-Literature search strategy employed. 

6-Evaluation of the literature. 

7-Applicable change or nursing theory utilized. 

8-Proposed implementation plan with outcome measures. 

9-Discussion of how evidence-based practice was used in creating the intervention plan. 

10-Plan for evaluating the proposed nursing intervention. 

11-Identification of potential barriers to plan implementation, and a discussion of how these could be overcome. 

12-Appendix section, for evaluation tools and educational materials, etc. are created.

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